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Researchers Say Used Coffee Grounds Can Be Used to Create Eco-Friendly Biofuel

Researchers Say Used Coffee Grounds Can Be Used to Create Eco-Friendly Biofuel

Researchers say that coffee grounds are promising as a fuel source

Coffee husks, called cascara, can also be recycled to make coffee flour and drinks.

While coffee often perks up our morning or mid-day slumps, used coffee grounds are often left to sit in landfills. In a study published in the Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, researchers found that rather than going to waste, used coffee grounds can be efficiently repurposed as an environmentally-friendly biofuel.

Spent coffee grounds contain up to 20 percent lipids and lignocellulose (dry plant material), which can be used as bioenergy. Though methods of extracting these materials have existed for some time, the researchers in the new study described a more efficient method based on a process called “in situ transesterification.” Through the method, oils are extracted from the coffee grounds and converted into biodiesel by mixing them with hexane at 140 degrees Fahrenheit. After one to two hours, the hexane is then evaporated to leave only the oil. Other materials, such as methane, a catalyst, and a glycerol by-product, are then added to make the biofuel.

“Our findings reveal that in situ transesterification, a single step biodiesel production process with significant cost savings and potential might provide a new industrial potential for the recovery of fuel from spent coffee grounds,” the study said.

To learn 10 mind-blowing facts about food waste in America, click here.


These guys think coffee can do a green roof good


We know that coffee can be both good and bad for our bodies, depending on who you ask. I know that ants are repelled by my used Turkish coffee grounds, and that the stuff makes a great fertilizer for mushrooms. But could used coffee grounds be good for your plants? University of Haifa scientists are planning to answer that question.

Researchers at the Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center are using the waste from coffee machines to fertilize an experimental plot in which different species of vegetation have been planted. The purpose of the research is to determine not just if coffee can be part of a substrate suitable for growing plants, but whether it might be even better than a normal substrate and will enhance the plants’ growth.

“At our research center we have a number of studies going that are examining what quality of the substrate and types of plants would be most suited for use on green roofs even with little or no maintenance. Using coffee waste is liable to improve the mix of minerals in the soil, and as a result, also improve plant growth on the roof,” said Shay Levy, the center’s manager.

The use of organic waste as a platform for ecological farming is already known, but despite the prevalence of used coffee (which can be taken from any coffeemaker or espresso machine), to date no one has examined its effectiveness as a green roof fertilizer.

The idea was the brainchild of Shai Linn, the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences and a member of the University’s Green Campus council. Linn saw the combination of coffee waste and the Green Roofs Research Center, which is headed by Prof. Leon Blaustein and seeks to benefit the environment by growing things on the roofs of buildings, as a natural one.

To conduct this study the Student Union “donated” 17 kilograms of coffee waste from the café it runs, which was mixed with the substrate that until now has been used on the experimental plots. The plots were sown with Maltese Cross Ricotia, hare’s tail, scilla, daffodils, and even herbs like hyssop, sage, and druce. Given that rain has already fallen it will soon be clear whether coffee does roof plants any good.

“This is a great way to turn waste into a resource,” said Dr. Levy. “There’s no lack of coffee waste on the contrary, we have more than enough of it. If we can prove that the coffee improves plant growth, it could be an amazingly ecological and economical solution for us and for the environment.”


These guys think coffee can do a green roof good


We know that coffee can be both good and bad for our bodies, depending on who you ask. I know that ants are repelled by my used Turkish coffee grounds, and that the stuff makes a great fertilizer for mushrooms. But could used coffee grounds be good for your plants? University of Haifa scientists are planning to answer that question.

Researchers at the Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center are using the waste from coffee machines to fertilize an experimental plot in which different species of vegetation have been planted. The purpose of the research is to determine not just if coffee can be part of a substrate suitable for growing plants, but whether it might be even better than a normal substrate and will enhance the plants’ growth.

“At our research center we have a number of studies going that are examining what quality of the substrate and types of plants would be most suited for use on green roofs even with little or no maintenance. Using coffee waste is liable to improve the mix of minerals in the soil, and as a result, also improve plant growth on the roof,” said Shay Levy, the center’s manager.

The use of organic waste as a platform for ecological farming is already known, but despite the prevalence of used coffee (which can be taken from any coffeemaker or espresso machine), to date no one has examined its effectiveness as a green roof fertilizer.

The idea was the brainchild of Shai Linn, the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences and a member of the University’s Green Campus council. Linn saw the combination of coffee waste and the Green Roofs Research Center, which is headed by Prof. Leon Blaustein and seeks to benefit the environment by growing things on the roofs of buildings, as a natural one.

To conduct this study the Student Union “donated” 17 kilograms of coffee waste from the café it runs, which was mixed with the substrate that until now has been used on the experimental plots. The plots were sown with Maltese Cross Ricotia, hare’s tail, scilla, daffodils, and even herbs like hyssop, sage, and druce. Given that rain has already fallen it will soon be clear whether coffee does roof plants any good.

“This is a great way to turn waste into a resource,” said Dr. Levy. “There’s no lack of coffee waste on the contrary, we have more than enough of it. If we can prove that the coffee improves plant growth, it could be an amazingly ecological and economical solution for us and for the environment.”


These guys think coffee can do a green roof good


We know that coffee can be both good and bad for our bodies, depending on who you ask. I know that ants are repelled by my used Turkish coffee grounds, and that the stuff makes a great fertilizer for mushrooms. But could used coffee grounds be good for your plants? University of Haifa scientists are planning to answer that question.

Researchers at the Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center are using the waste from coffee machines to fertilize an experimental plot in which different species of vegetation have been planted. The purpose of the research is to determine not just if coffee can be part of a substrate suitable for growing plants, but whether it might be even better than a normal substrate and will enhance the plants’ growth.

“At our research center we have a number of studies going that are examining what quality of the substrate and types of plants would be most suited for use on green roofs even with little or no maintenance. Using coffee waste is liable to improve the mix of minerals in the soil, and as a result, also improve plant growth on the roof,” said Shay Levy, the center’s manager.

The use of organic waste as a platform for ecological farming is already known, but despite the prevalence of used coffee (which can be taken from any coffeemaker or espresso machine), to date no one has examined its effectiveness as a green roof fertilizer.

The idea was the brainchild of Shai Linn, the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences and a member of the University’s Green Campus council. Linn saw the combination of coffee waste and the Green Roofs Research Center, which is headed by Prof. Leon Blaustein and seeks to benefit the environment by growing things on the roofs of buildings, as a natural one.

To conduct this study the Student Union “donated” 17 kilograms of coffee waste from the café it runs, which was mixed with the substrate that until now has been used on the experimental plots. The plots were sown with Maltese Cross Ricotia, hare’s tail, scilla, daffodils, and even herbs like hyssop, sage, and druce. Given that rain has already fallen it will soon be clear whether coffee does roof plants any good.

“This is a great way to turn waste into a resource,” said Dr. Levy. “There’s no lack of coffee waste on the contrary, we have more than enough of it. If we can prove that the coffee improves plant growth, it could be an amazingly ecological and economical solution for us and for the environment.”


These guys think coffee can do a green roof good


We know that coffee can be both good and bad for our bodies, depending on who you ask. I know that ants are repelled by my used Turkish coffee grounds, and that the stuff makes a great fertilizer for mushrooms. But could used coffee grounds be good for your plants? University of Haifa scientists are planning to answer that question.

Researchers at the Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center are using the waste from coffee machines to fertilize an experimental plot in which different species of vegetation have been planted. The purpose of the research is to determine not just if coffee can be part of a substrate suitable for growing plants, but whether it might be even better than a normal substrate and will enhance the plants’ growth.

“At our research center we have a number of studies going that are examining what quality of the substrate and types of plants would be most suited for use on green roofs even with little or no maintenance. Using coffee waste is liable to improve the mix of minerals in the soil, and as a result, also improve plant growth on the roof,” said Shay Levy, the center’s manager.

The use of organic waste as a platform for ecological farming is already known, but despite the prevalence of used coffee (which can be taken from any coffeemaker or espresso machine), to date no one has examined its effectiveness as a green roof fertilizer.

The idea was the brainchild of Shai Linn, the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences and a member of the University’s Green Campus council. Linn saw the combination of coffee waste and the Green Roofs Research Center, which is headed by Prof. Leon Blaustein and seeks to benefit the environment by growing things on the roofs of buildings, as a natural one.

To conduct this study the Student Union “donated” 17 kilograms of coffee waste from the café it runs, which was mixed with the substrate that until now has been used on the experimental plots. The plots were sown with Maltese Cross Ricotia, hare’s tail, scilla, daffodils, and even herbs like hyssop, sage, and druce. Given that rain has already fallen it will soon be clear whether coffee does roof plants any good.

“This is a great way to turn waste into a resource,” said Dr. Levy. “There’s no lack of coffee waste on the contrary, we have more than enough of it. If we can prove that the coffee improves plant growth, it could be an amazingly ecological and economical solution for us and for the environment.”


These guys think coffee can do a green roof good


We know that coffee can be both good and bad for our bodies, depending on who you ask. I know that ants are repelled by my used Turkish coffee grounds, and that the stuff makes a great fertilizer for mushrooms. But could used coffee grounds be good for your plants? University of Haifa scientists are planning to answer that question.

Researchers at the Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center are using the waste from coffee machines to fertilize an experimental plot in which different species of vegetation have been planted. The purpose of the research is to determine not just if coffee can be part of a substrate suitable for growing plants, but whether it might be even better than a normal substrate and will enhance the plants’ growth.

“At our research center we have a number of studies going that are examining what quality of the substrate and types of plants would be most suited for use on green roofs even with little or no maintenance. Using coffee waste is liable to improve the mix of minerals in the soil, and as a result, also improve plant growth on the roof,” said Shay Levy, the center’s manager.

The use of organic waste as a platform for ecological farming is already known, but despite the prevalence of used coffee (which can be taken from any coffeemaker or espresso machine), to date no one has examined its effectiveness as a green roof fertilizer.

The idea was the brainchild of Shai Linn, the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences and a member of the University’s Green Campus council. Linn saw the combination of coffee waste and the Green Roofs Research Center, which is headed by Prof. Leon Blaustein and seeks to benefit the environment by growing things on the roofs of buildings, as a natural one.

To conduct this study the Student Union “donated” 17 kilograms of coffee waste from the café it runs, which was mixed with the substrate that until now has been used on the experimental plots. The plots were sown with Maltese Cross Ricotia, hare’s tail, scilla, daffodils, and even herbs like hyssop, sage, and druce. Given that rain has already fallen it will soon be clear whether coffee does roof plants any good.

“This is a great way to turn waste into a resource,” said Dr. Levy. “There’s no lack of coffee waste on the contrary, we have more than enough of it. If we can prove that the coffee improves plant growth, it could be an amazingly ecological and economical solution for us and for the environment.”


These guys think coffee can do a green roof good


We know that coffee can be both good and bad for our bodies, depending on who you ask. I know that ants are repelled by my used Turkish coffee grounds, and that the stuff makes a great fertilizer for mushrooms. But could used coffee grounds be good for your plants? University of Haifa scientists are planning to answer that question.

Researchers at the Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center are using the waste from coffee machines to fertilize an experimental plot in which different species of vegetation have been planted. The purpose of the research is to determine not just if coffee can be part of a substrate suitable for growing plants, but whether it might be even better than a normal substrate and will enhance the plants’ growth.

“At our research center we have a number of studies going that are examining what quality of the substrate and types of plants would be most suited for use on green roofs even with little or no maintenance. Using coffee waste is liable to improve the mix of minerals in the soil, and as a result, also improve plant growth on the roof,” said Shay Levy, the center’s manager.

The use of organic waste as a platform for ecological farming is already known, but despite the prevalence of used coffee (which can be taken from any coffeemaker or espresso machine), to date no one has examined its effectiveness as a green roof fertilizer.

The idea was the brainchild of Shai Linn, the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences and a member of the University’s Green Campus council. Linn saw the combination of coffee waste and the Green Roofs Research Center, which is headed by Prof. Leon Blaustein and seeks to benefit the environment by growing things on the roofs of buildings, as a natural one.

To conduct this study the Student Union “donated” 17 kilograms of coffee waste from the café it runs, which was mixed with the substrate that until now has been used on the experimental plots. The plots were sown with Maltese Cross Ricotia, hare’s tail, scilla, daffodils, and even herbs like hyssop, sage, and druce. Given that rain has already fallen it will soon be clear whether coffee does roof plants any good.

“This is a great way to turn waste into a resource,” said Dr. Levy. “There’s no lack of coffee waste on the contrary, we have more than enough of it. If we can prove that the coffee improves plant growth, it could be an amazingly ecological and economical solution for us and for the environment.”


These guys think coffee can do a green roof good


We know that coffee can be both good and bad for our bodies, depending on who you ask. I know that ants are repelled by my used Turkish coffee grounds, and that the stuff makes a great fertilizer for mushrooms. But could used coffee grounds be good for your plants? University of Haifa scientists are planning to answer that question.

Researchers at the Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center are using the waste from coffee machines to fertilize an experimental plot in which different species of vegetation have been planted. The purpose of the research is to determine not just if coffee can be part of a substrate suitable for growing plants, but whether it might be even better than a normal substrate and will enhance the plants’ growth.

“At our research center we have a number of studies going that are examining what quality of the substrate and types of plants would be most suited for use on green roofs even with little or no maintenance. Using coffee waste is liable to improve the mix of minerals in the soil, and as a result, also improve plant growth on the roof,” said Shay Levy, the center’s manager.

The use of organic waste as a platform for ecological farming is already known, but despite the prevalence of used coffee (which can be taken from any coffeemaker or espresso machine), to date no one has examined its effectiveness as a green roof fertilizer.

The idea was the brainchild of Shai Linn, the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences and a member of the University’s Green Campus council. Linn saw the combination of coffee waste and the Green Roofs Research Center, which is headed by Prof. Leon Blaustein and seeks to benefit the environment by growing things on the roofs of buildings, as a natural one.

To conduct this study the Student Union “donated” 17 kilograms of coffee waste from the café it runs, which was mixed with the substrate that until now has been used on the experimental plots. The plots were sown with Maltese Cross Ricotia, hare’s tail, scilla, daffodils, and even herbs like hyssop, sage, and druce. Given that rain has already fallen it will soon be clear whether coffee does roof plants any good.

“This is a great way to turn waste into a resource,” said Dr. Levy. “There’s no lack of coffee waste on the contrary, we have more than enough of it. If we can prove that the coffee improves plant growth, it could be an amazingly ecological and economical solution for us and for the environment.”


These guys think coffee can do a green roof good


We know that coffee can be both good and bad for our bodies, depending on who you ask. I know that ants are repelled by my used Turkish coffee grounds, and that the stuff makes a great fertilizer for mushrooms. But could used coffee grounds be good for your plants? University of Haifa scientists are planning to answer that question.

Researchers at the Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center are using the waste from coffee machines to fertilize an experimental plot in which different species of vegetation have been planted. The purpose of the research is to determine not just if coffee can be part of a substrate suitable for growing plants, but whether it might be even better than a normal substrate and will enhance the plants’ growth.

“At our research center we have a number of studies going that are examining what quality of the substrate and types of plants would be most suited for use on green roofs even with little or no maintenance. Using coffee waste is liable to improve the mix of minerals in the soil, and as a result, also improve plant growth on the roof,” said Shay Levy, the center’s manager.

The use of organic waste as a platform for ecological farming is already known, but despite the prevalence of used coffee (which can be taken from any coffeemaker or espresso machine), to date no one has examined its effectiveness as a green roof fertilizer.

The idea was the brainchild of Shai Linn, the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences and a member of the University’s Green Campus council. Linn saw the combination of coffee waste and the Green Roofs Research Center, which is headed by Prof. Leon Blaustein and seeks to benefit the environment by growing things on the roofs of buildings, as a natural one.

To conduct this study the Student Union “donated” 17 kilograms of coffee waste from the café it runs, which was mixed with the substrate that until now has been used on the experimental plots. The plots were sown with Maltese Cross Ricotia, hare’s tail, scilla, daffodils, and even herbs like hyssop, sage, and druce. Given that rain has already fallen it will soon be clear whether coffee does roof plants any good.

“This is a great way to turn waste into a resource,” said Dr. Levy. “There’s no lack of coffee waste on the contrary, we have more than enough of it. If we can prove that the coffee improves plant growth, it could be an amazingly ecological and economical solution for us and for the environment.”


These guys think coffee can do a green roof good


We know that coffee can be both good and bad for our bodies, depending on who you ask. I know that ants are repelled by my used Turkish coffee grounds, and that the stuff makes a great fertilizer for mushrooms. But could used coffee grounds be good for your plants? University of Haifa scientists are planning to answer that question.

Researchers at the Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center are using the waste from coffee machines to fertilize an experimental plot in which different species of vegetation have been planted. The purpose of the research is to determine not just if coffee can be part of a substrate suitable for growing plants, but whether it might be even better than a normal substrate and will enhance the plants’ growth.

“At our research center we have a number of studies going that are examining what quality of the substrate and types of plants would be most suited for use on green roofs even with little or no maintenance. Using coffee waste is liable to improve the mix of minerals in the soil, and as a result, also improve plant growth on the roof,” said Shay Levy, the center’s manager.

The use of organic waste as a platform for ecological farming is already known, but despite the prevalence of used coffee (which can be taken from any coffeemaker or espresso machine), to date no one has examined its effectiveness as a green roof fertilizer.

The idea was the brainchild of Shai Linn, the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences and a member of the University’s Green Campus council. Linn saw the combination of coffee waste and the Green Roofs Research Center, which is headed by Prof. Leon Blaustein and seeks to benefit the environment by growing things on the roofs of buildings, as a natural one.

To conduct this study the Student Union “donated” 17 kilograms of coffee waste from the café it runs, which was mixed with the substrate that until now has been used on the experimental plots. The plots were sown with Maltese Cross Ricotia, hare’s tail, scilla, daffodils, and even herbs like hyssop, sage, and druce. Given that rain has already fallen it will soon be clear whether coffee does roof plants any good.

“This is a great way to turn waste into a resource,” said Dr. Levy. “There’s no lack of coffee waste on the contrary, we have more than enough of it. If we can prove that the coffee improves plant growth, it could be an amazingly ecological and economical solution for us and for the environment.”


These guys think coffee can do a green roof good


We know that coffee can be both good and bad for our bodies, depending on who you ask. I know that ants are repelled by my used Turkish coffee grounds, and that the stuff makes a great fertilizer for mushrooms. But could used coffee grounds be good for your plants? University of Haifa scientists are planning to answer that question.

Researchers at the Kadas Green Roofs Ecology Research Center are using the waste from coffee machines to fertilize an experimental plot in which different species of vegetation have been planted. The purpose of the research is to determine not just if coffee can be part of a substrate suitable for growing plants, but whether it might be even better than a normal substrate and will enhance the plants’ growth.

“At our research center we have a number of studies going that are examining what quality of the substrate and types of plants would be most suited for use on green roofs even with little or no maintenance. Using coffee waste is liable to improve the mix of minerals in the soil, and as a result, also improve plant growth on the roof,” said Shay Levy, the center’s manager.

The use of organic waste as a platform for ecological farming is already known, but despite the prevalence of used coffee (which can be taken from any coffeemaker or espresso machine), to date no one has examined its effectiveness as a green roof fertilizer.

The idea was the brainchild of Shai Linn, the dean of the Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences and a member of the University’s Green Campus council. Linn saw the combination of coffee waste and the Green Roofs Research Center, which is headed by Prof. Leon Blaustein and seeks to benefit the environment by growing things on the roofs of buildings, as a natural one.

To conduct this study the Student Union “donated” 17 kilograms of coffee waste from the café it runs, which was mixed with the substrate that until now has been used on the experimental plots. The plots were sown with Maltese Cross Ricotia, hare’s tail, scilla, daffodils, and even herbs like hyssop, sage, and druce. Given that rain has already fallen it will soon be clear whether coffee does roof plants any good.

“This is a great way to turn waste into a resource,” said Dr. Levy. “There’s no lack of coffee waste on the contrary, we have more than enough of it. If we can prove that the coffee improves plant growth, it could be an amazingly ecological and economical solution for us and for the environment.”


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